Why Are We Running Out of Time? A Business History Perspective on the Environmental Crisis

This special issue in Business History Review on Business and the Environment seeks to promote new approaches in business history designed to explore of the role of business in both creating and addressing the mounting environmental crisis that has become apparent over the last half century.


Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs – via University of Bristol

The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful?…


Dynamics behind life’s supernova in the Ordovician

Studying how biodiversity on our planet has developed through time and how it reacted to environmental changes would be relatively straight-forward if we could time-travel, as ecologists.…


Planning for Disasters in a Changing Environment

In October 2018 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a special report (SR15) warning of the impacts of a global rise in temperature above 1.5 C average, explaining that only 12 years remained before irreversible changes and disasters were ‘baked’ into the global system.…


Making waves in the world of renewable energy

Renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar power are becoming commonplace across the world, but yet it often seems that we are still searching for the renewable resource that will revolutionise the energy industry.…


Reconstructing Our World in 4D: Advances in Palaeogeography Special Issue

The latest special issue “Advances in Palaeogeography” in Geological Magazine presents a collection of ten articles widely addressing a range of new and important topics within the field of palaeogeography.


Thank the oceans for softening the blow of climate change

Climate change is the greatest challenge facing humanity. It’s an almighty catastrophe that will only become worse with time. We’ll be seeing more powerful storms, increasingly devastating wildfires, longer droughts and recurring floods, to name but a few of the impacts of climate change that are quickly becoming commonplace globally.…


Fossil shark teeth discovered in leftover rock that contained SUE the T. rex

Freshwater shark lived in South Dakota, had teeth shaped like “Galaga” spaceships SUE the T. rex is the most famous fossil from the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota—the most complete skeleton ever discovered of the world’s most popular dinosaur.…


Clean energy transitions in a global economy

Addressing climate change effectively requires making low-carbon technologies competitive against existing fossil-fuel based energy technologies. Bargaining over policies to promote clean energy is often as a domestic issue, pitting interest groups against each another as they vie to shape national polices.…


Editors in Action: Q&A with Geological Magazine Board Member Dr. Jacqueline Halpin

Dr. Jacqueline Halpin is a Research Fellow in the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and Adjunct Researcher in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES) and Earth Sciences at the University of Tasmania.…


Large-scale battery storage: Challenges and opportunities for technology and policy

Could a large-enough battery cushion the swings in wind and solar power? And can renewable energy be trusted, or are we just seeing technical challenges to implementation? In a recent review article published in MRS Energy & Sustainability, energy experts weigh in on these questions and consider the challenges and opportunities for technology and policy in relation to large-scale battery storage. The article also addresses a fascinating case study from South Australia, which currently houses the world's biggest battery.


New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley

Upper jaws of a new dinosaur from Victoria, Australia, give fresh insight into the diversity of small herbivorous dinosaurs that once inhabited the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley 125 million years ago A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125 million year old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia.…