Is Extinction Rebellion the answer to our prayers?

Throngs of young (and not so young) people refusing to pretend that the human race is not in the most serious crisis it has ever faced.…


The Meaning and Telos of Israel’s Election: An Interfaith Response to N.T. Wright’s Reading of Paul

Until 5th November 2019, get free access to Joel Kaminsky and Mark Reasoner’s full article ‘The Meaning and Telos of Israel’s Election: An Interfaith Response to N.T.…


‘Great things are done when (Wo)Men & Mountains meet’. Cécile Morette and the Les Houches Summer School for Theoretical Physics (1951-1972)

This article explores the history of what was surely one of the strongest elements of that social apparatus, and one of the most innovative: the first and most effective ‘crash course’ in theoretical physics, the Les Houches School of Theoretical Physics, a summer school founded in 1951 by the young Cécile Morette (1922-1971), in a small alpine village.


Tyrolean stigmata in England: the voyage of the supernatural in the nineteenth century

Two young women in villages less than ten miles apart drew international attention from devout Catholics and sensation seekers.


10 things we learned about the History of Reproduction

We brought together experts from several disciplines and challenged them to think about change and continuity in the history of procreation.


The materiality of marriage in the artisan community of Renaissance Verona

Building on recent scholarship studying the materiality of the non-elite this article investigates the domestic material culture of the artisan community in sixteenth-century Verona.


How they did it: a Greek temple’s ruins suggest lifting machines were used 150 years earlier than previously thought

As modern Greeks undertake to reconstruct the Parthenon, largely using stone material from the site’s ruins, a question naturally arises: How did ancient Greeks construct massive temples and other buildings — lifting and placing one heavy block at a time, and up multiple rows in a wall — without modern advanced machinery?…


Born-digital photography: not all prints are created equal

A few years ago, I opted to take on the overwhelming task of organizing and digitizing the records associated with the legacy collections at the Natural History Museum of Utah.…


The Dark Side of Molecules: Politics and Chemistry in the 20th century

When trying to choose the science and the scientists that shaped the 20th century, many think about nuclear energy and the near mythical names of Maria Skłodowska-Curie, Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Albert Einstein, or perhaps about the revolution caused by molecular biology and the almost magical DNA and its 1953 discovery by James Watson and Francis Crick.…


Islam and the Middle East – an article collection from Renaissance Quarterly

The editors of Renaissance Quarterly are pleased to provide free access to the following selection of articles relating to Islam and the Middle East during the Early Modern period.


Product co-creation: together we can build something wonderful

Co-creation is not a new idea. For years companies have been seeking advice from their customers about how they can improve their products and services, either by asking directly, by quietly listening, or by learning from data.…


Another year of peer review at Cambridge University Press…

Improvements, Iterations, and Infrastructure Cambridge University Press has a set of objectives in the peer review space . . . with several question marks still: Objectives: Increase transparency Support reviewer recognition Offer more training resources for reviewers Improve internal processes to make peer review more efficient Questions: What are the evolving challenges to peer review and opportunities in evolving forms of scholarly communication for peer review and how do we respond to them?…