The Political Theory of American Populism

The study of the late nineteenth-century American Populist movement has long been one of the liveliest fields in American historiography. This stature definitely is fitting for one of the most formidable social movements in American history – and an uncomfortable outlier to today’s anti-populist consensus.


Bringing the Past to (Virtual) Life through Digital History Research and Pedagogy

The Mitford and Launditch Hundred House of Industry, now the Gressenhall Farm and Workhouse Museum, presents the historian with major opportunities for (re)imagining the past. Our digital modelling necessitated pulling off the mask it currently wears as a museum, stripping away the residue of its time as a twentieth-century Old Age Home, and uncovering the architectural and functional changes that turned it into a Union Workhouse of the New Poor Law period, after 1834.


Migrant workers’ ‘Rights-Talk’: An immense promise facing high social and organizational barriers

The late twentieth and early twenty first centuries have […] come to be widely touted as the era of human rights – a sentiment that captures both the preponderance of rights-talk and the immense promise that it invariably carries.


New read-only option on Higher Education from Cambridge University Press

Since the launch of our Higher Education website in August 2020, we have been listening to your feedback and looking for ways we can improve the site.…


Research4Life – Levelling the playing field for researchers in the Global South

Find out more about Cambridge's partnership with Research4Life which opens up our collection to 125 lowere and middle income countries.


Molecules from the venom of scorpions as possible antichagasic drugs

The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Arg-substituted VmCT1 analogs reveals promising candidate for the development of new antichagasic agent Molecules isolated from the venom of scorpions can be used as alternative treatments for parasitic and bacterial infections.…


A very fast survey of the radio sky: The Rapid ASKAP Continuum Survey (RACS)

The Rapid ASKAP Continuum Survey (RACS) is exactly that: rapid, taking just 300 hours with the new Australian SKA Pathfinder radio-telescope. It covers all of the sky visible from the telescope’s site in Western Australia.…


How do we work with the University of Cambridge? The University Collaboration Budget

As part of our blog post series looking at how Cambridge University Press works with Cambridge University, we learn more about the University Collaboration Budget.…


Creating a healthier food environment in Singapore: Analysis

Public Health Nutrition Editorial Highlight: ‘Identifying implementation gaps and priorities for the Singapore government to improve food environment policies:  perspectives from a local expert panel’ In March 2018 we invited a panel of 20 national experts in public health nutrition or chronic disease prevention to evaluate the actions of the Singapore’s governments in creating healthier food environments.…


Does Wright Get Paul on Israel Right? Continued Debate

Jews and Christians are both united and divided by the parts of the Bible that they hold in common. Many see Paul’s innovative, at times “counter” readings of the Hebrew Bible as standing at the beginning of the process that led to the eventual separation between rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity.…


Backcross breeding for improvement of heat tolerance at reproductive phase in Thai rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties

Rice production determines food security for many countries, as it is the only major grain grown exclusively for food and provides over one fifth of the calories consumed worldwide. …


Understanding the Mexica

Articles in Ancient Mesoamerica offer insights about the Mexican highlands before, during, and after the Mexica took control of it. In only a couple hundred years, they created an empire that stretched from coast to coast in ancient Mesoamerica.…