From the Fetus, the Child

Any parent with two or more children knows that babies are different at birth and often those differences persist as the baby develops.…


The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information

This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Banquet in Early Modern England‘ Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…


The current state of parasite discovery and taxonomy

The latest Paper of the Month from Parasitology is ‘The geography of parasite discovery across space and over time’ by Robert Poulin and Fátima Jorge.…


The National Rise in Residential Segregation

People talk a lot about segregation.  Every week it seems that news reports or some new academic finding shows that segregation is related to some salient outcome.  The traditional story of how America became segregated is that blacks moved to Northern cities in the early twentieth century and whites, aided by government mortgage programs and the development of the interstate highway, fled to suburban areas, creating cities with black and poor urban cores and wealthier and whiter suburbs.  With the flight of wealthier white residents to the suburbs, the resources available to the urban core declined, leaving minorities fewer resources and effectively creating a poverty trap.…


Barriers to exclusive breast-feeding in Indonesian hospitals

The Nutrition Society Paper of the Month for July is from Public Health Nutrition and is entitled ‘Barriers to exclusive breast-feeding in Indonesian hospitals: a qualitative study of early infant feeding practices’ by Authors: Valerie J Flaherman, Shannon Chan, Riya Desai, Fransisca Handy Agung, Hendri Hartati and Fitra Yelda.


The latest KBART improvements

Cambridge Core was designed to allow for continual improvement based on feedback from our customers. Since launch, KBART lists have seen significant improvements, with the latest being the ability to select more granular options when setting variables for your list downloads.…


Porous Carbon and Carbonaceous Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage

Growing awareness of increasing global population and energy demand, diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, proliferating environmental pollution, and climate change has driven rapid developments in materials research in energy conversion and storage.


When less public participation may be better public participation

Currently, policymaking is torn between two demands. On the one hand, issues become increasingly complex, calling for the incorporation of expertise in the policymaking process and increasingly complex decision-making procedures.…


“What is the Meaning of Meaning in Paul Tillich’s Theology?”

For the past few years, I have been at work on a book about the word meaning in such expressions as “the meaning of life,” “searching for meaning,” “ultimate meaning,” “higher meaning.” Several features of the word, apart from its ubiquity in popular and academic circles, struck me: (1) it is seldom defined and is thus given to ambiguity; (2) its meaning is slippery; (3) the English word is by nature different from its near-equivalents in other European languages because it is a verbal noun and thus at least suggests agency: something carries out the act denoted by the verb to mean.…


Did the Rabbis Believe in Agreus Pan? Rabbinic Relationships with Roman Power, Culture, and Religion in Genesis Rabbah 63

Genesis Rabbah, a rabbinic midrash (work of homiletical exegesis) compiled in Byzantine Palestine relates a fascinating story about the great Roman emperor, Diocletian (224–311 CE).…


Moving Texts: A Hermeneutics of the Gospel According to Hollywood

Angelic choirs hum as calligraphic titles fill the screen. As the choir soars, an authoritative voice begins a tale that may be both alien and familiar: the coming of a heavenly visitor whose story bears repeating.…


MRS President Sean Hearne on advocating on behalf of the materials research community

Many of us receive at least some, if not all, of our research funds from governmental agencies. These grants may be for advancing the forefronts of existing technologies or for creating a new phase of matter or compound for yet-to-be-discovered applications.